Monthly Archives: February 2016

  • 0

Featured Client-Loomis Tank Centers

Featured Client-Loomis Tank Centers

Loomis Tanks

Large, small, medium, colossal, tall, short or petite, Loomis Tanks has got you covered! Now that I’ve got your attention. I would like to introduce one of our newest clients, Loomis Tank Centers; we are very pleased and excited to be working closely with Dan and their great staff.

The Loomis family has been in business since 1905, wow that’s a long time! The family business was founded by E.C. Loomis, the great-grandfather of Dan Loomis, whom is the current owner of Loomis Tanks. Loomis has various businesses in our local area, from insurance to feed and supplies. But we are all about the Tanks, queue that one song!

Loomis Tank Center is a wholesale and retail distributor of polyethylene, fiberglass and steel tanks for the storage and transportation of water and the bulk storage and transportation of chemicals and fertilizers. Basically if you need to transport water for Shamu, they have a tank for you!

The experience and knowledge within the Loomis Tank management and long-term staff is unmatched in tank manufacturing and distribution in the US. They make sure their clients are well informed and get the best advice about their tank purchase, which is not as easy as you tank. 😉

They proudly supply storage tanks to various professionals and non-professionals, such as:

  • Contractors
  • Homeowners
  • Farmers
  • Ranchers
  • Industrial Engineers
  • Governments
  • Municipalities

 
7 retail locations in California, Arizona, and Nevada. With over 40 factory direct locations nationwide so that they can offer the best pricing and freight rates possible.

That being said, if you need a septic tank, water tank or storage tanks for chemicals and fertilizers, whether you’re looking for steel, fiberglass or plastic tanks, Loomis Tank Centers has a tank for you! Simply visit them by clicking here.


  • 0

Our Adventure in 3D Printing


We absolutely love new technology so when the opportunity to have a 3D printer in the office came along, we jumped on it. For our AuLaCart project we needed a custom case to protect the equipment and 3D printers are great for very small scale custom work.

In printing our first project, the AuLaCart case that is part of our recent patent filing, we quickly encountered our first challenge: just how slow this process can be. In our case the print time was well over 3 days and several of the parts had to be printed multiple times because of warpage. While the finished case looks like only two parts, the reality is that there are 8 parts that have to be ground down and glued together to complete the case.


In the learning process, it was interesting to discover that “solid” pieces are really hollow. When you slice the design from the stl file (design file) to gCode (printer instructions) it automatically fills large areas with a honeycomb structure to give it strength without wasting your expensive supplies. This improves the warpage that can happen when there is lots of material cooling at different rates. This may not sound like a big deal but we quickly found that temperature control is one of the biggest learning curves in 3D printing. Both the extruder and bed of the printer are heated and finding the right temperature settings can take time and a number of failures. The printer that we have is an open design so to control temp we ended up building a really “fancy” enclosure (implied sarcasm) from a cardboard box with a window made of shipping tape. Fancy-3d-Printer-CaseWhile it may not be top of the line, it makes a big difference in the success rate of printing parts.

As we worked with the printer we experimented with various types of different materials such as plastic, polycarbonate, carbon fiber and even a type of wood. The most difficult by far was the polycarbonate, which is best known by the brand name of Lexan. This is a tough material and we never printed a successful part with this. The reason is that the temperature need for this specific material is 310c on the extruder and our printer will only go to about 290. That being said, the material never turned as liquid as we needed and therefor failed every time. Thank heavens, we recently we found a polycarbonate that can be printed from a lower temperature and we finally got a successful print.

One material that was especially interesting was carbon fiber and this material makes some really strong prints. The material itself is stiff and breaks easily from the roll. However once printed this is impressively strong material. To test materials we print small scale rocket ships. When using other materials it was easy to break parts off of the rocket ships however the carbon fiber rocket was nearly impossible to break (unless you are superman strong like my boss Mr. Bob, who was successful in breaking a part of my carbon fiber rocket). Carbon fiber is not the cheapest material you can print with, but if your print needs to stand up it is a good choice.

So far, our only production work has been the AuLaCart case and, because of the size, it was printed in 8 pieces and had to be glued together. 3D printing is not as accurate as conventional machining of a part so when it comes time to fit parts there is a fair amount of hand work on anything with tight tolerances. In our case, all the edges that were to be glued had to be flattened to get an edge that would glue properly and result in the right size of the final part. The printed surface is rough and needs to be treated if you want smooth surfaces. The only surface that gets a smooth surface is the one that attaches to the printing bed so you might want to consider that when you position the piece for printing.

The bottom line with 3D printing is that it is a very cool and interesting technology that works best when hot. We are now discussing ways that this new ability might be beneficial to our clients so if you have a thought for using 3D printing in marketing, please let us know.


  • 0

Why I do crazy things

start up weekend team

Over the weekend of January 15-17th I participated in the Startup Weekend at Cal Poly. As crazy as it sounds this was my sixth Startup Weekend! A Startup Weekend is a global 54-hour long competition to create new businesses. According to the organizing group, 12% of the teams at a Startup Weekend will continue to pursue their idea after the Weekend is over and locally we have dozens of new businesses that include a Startup Weekend in their story. In this event 107 really smart and motivated individuals came together to pitch ideas, form teams, build plans, and present them to the world.

As the CEO of a successful, 20-year-old, digital marketing business an obvious question might be why would I burn an entire weekend to work on a new business? There are actually several reasons that this is important to my business. These events contain many of the people that will go into our communities and launch businesses; as a marketing company I have to be prepared to serve them and help them go to market. The bottom line is that it is tough to partner with people you do not understand.

First are the ideas

Innovation is a critical part of running any business and the longer the business has been around the more challenging innovation becomes. The Startup Weekends are nothing if not innovating. By being at the event I got to listen to the ideas of 100+ smart people pitching 60+ ideas. If your business needs to think about what’s next, this certainly provides a wealth of information to consider. I have been in hundreds of brainstorming meetings within businesses and I have never seen so many ideas generated in such a short period of time. The second phase of the ‘idea generation’ process is a crowd selection process that allows each person to choose their top 3 business ideas with no bias. Once this is done the top 12 ideas move forward to the next phase.

Next are the Teams

After pitches and crowd selections comes the team formations; 107 people rapidly divide and evolve into 12 teams in about 10 minutes. Some may think that this would result in a number of dysfunctional teams but amazingly it does not! This is because those who are attracted to this event all want to innovate and change the world which requires a certain type of person.In addition, the crowd was balanced by the event registration which controlled the mix of business, design, and engineering talent in the room. The end results were 12 teams, each with a reasonable balance to them. In our team we had 3 business persona’s and 2 developers with a goal of reinventing the retail checkout experience.

Next are the Plans

With the teams in place the hard work begins and here we experience the typical business evolution. We started with one concept but ran into problems that nobody had thought of before. In response, we pivoted and changed the idea again and again. This happened three times over the second day but, unlike in a normal business, there was no friction simply because everyone had expected to have to pivot the idea in the first place. Just imagine, a frictionless change process in a business! That truly is what happens and it is because of the expectations and the types of people attracted to the event. Almost every team went through one or more pivots before the team gelled around a refined idea that had 100% buy-in from the entire team. When you have this harmony amazing things can happen.

Next Tell all your friends about your Goals

The final step of a Startup Weekend is the presentation and judging. In our event we had 12 teams doing business presentations after 3 days and every team was successful with no on-stage disasters. From here many of the groups decide to continue with their idea and they have already introduced their idea to the world.

So Why Do I Do Crazy Things Like Startup Weekends?

  1. It expands my network into the next generation of businesses
  2. It makes me think about innovations from new perspectives
  3. It lets me see trends as they emerge from the minds of innovators
  4. It gives me a chance to put my ideas in front of 100+ smart people and judge their reaction
  5. Some of these might be clients in the future
  6. Even if the business never launches the people in the will likely launch something else
  7. It’s fun to hang out with smart people and discuss challenging ideas

Contact Us

Call us to see what's next for your marketing.